Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Reviews: BECKY SHAW at Theatre Conspiracy (3)

Demis Crudeli / kanaglia.altervista.org
Becky Shaw - the character - is a hot mess. One blind date and the girl doesn't know whether to walk into a hospital or a police station. No friends, no family, no money. Dropped out of Brown. No car. Becky Shaw has one thing. Wits And she knows how to use them. 

"Becky Shaw" takes five people and asks this: Every person has their own truth. What happens when the truths diverge? Equity actress Kim Crow and Tera Nicole Miller deliver standout turns.  Interesting, fascinating and worth a look - but the show often feels listless and lacks a critical energy. 

Tickets are $20. Anyone under 30 can get their ticket for just $10, Thursday performances are “buy one get one half off” and Opening Night is “pay what you will.” Call 239-936-3239 or theatreconspiracy.org.

Read the full review:
http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2013/nov/25/review-theatre-conspiracy-becky-shaw-tickets/

OTHER CRITICS:

Charles Runnells (The News-Press)
Theatre Conspiracy's 'Becky Shaw' features one bachelor, one bad date
As far as matchmaking goes, this one seems destined to fail. The sarcastic, mean-spirited Max Garrett relishes the role of the jerk and gladly barrels through a new girlfriend every three months. So he’s bound to roll right over the fragile, needy Becky Shaw. But there’s more to both characters than meets the eye in Theatre Conspiracy’s new comedy, “Becky Shaw.” (read the full review)


Nancy Stetson (Florida Weekly)
No love connection in a blind date with ‘Becky Shaw’
“Becky Shaw” is one strange play. Toward the end of the second act, when Suzanna (Denise Scott) moans, “I’m so confused,” I thought: “Me too, sister!” Theatre Conspiracy, where “Becky Shaw” is playing through Dec. 15, is known for putting on offbeat fare. But this production doesn’t seem offbeat as much as off-rhythm. The dialogue moved forward in a herkyjerky manner. Throughout the show, something just felt off. The pieces were there, but they weren’t fitting together. I kept trying to decide if it was the production, the pacing or the play itself — or a combination of the three. (read the full review)

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